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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014

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Zurich: 'Pop Aye' Wins Best Feature Film Award

8 October 2017 11:26 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Pop Aye, a comedic drama from Singapore filmmaker Kirsten Tan, has won the top prize of best international feature film at the 13th Zurich International Film Festival.

The feature is an unconventional road trip that follows a disheartened architect who leaves the city and travels across the country, accompanied by an elephant (called Popeye) he adopts along the way.

Pop Aye premiered in the World Drama section at Sundance and was selected by Singapore to represent the country in the foreign language category of the 2018 Oscars.

Rahul Jain's Machines, »

- Scott Roxborough

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Foreign-Language Oscar Race is 27 Percent Women-Directed

5 October 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Mattie Do’s “Dearest Sister” was submitted by Laos

We’ll have to wait until January 23 for Oscar nominations to be announced, but the Academy has released the titles of all of the films competing in the foreign-language Oscar race. According to Deadline, a record-setting number of countries have submitted films for consideration in the category. Of 92 films vying for a nomination, 25 are directed or co-directed by women by our count — an encouraging 27 percent. A nine-film shortlist will follow before final nominations are revealed.

Nineteen percent of last year’s crop of films submitted in this category were directed or co-directed by women. Just one of them ended up scoring a nod — Maren Ade’s daughter-father dramedy “Toni Erdmann.”

For comparison’s sake, consider the fact that none of this year’s or last year’s Best Picture nominees were helmed by women. The last time a woman-directed film received a Best Picture nomination was Ava DuVernay’s “Selma” back in 2015. So, women directors are better represented in the foreign-language category — featuring women directors from all over the world — than the largely American Best Picture race.

We’ve reported on some of the women-helmed features that have been submitted for the upcoming 90th Academy Awards, including Roya Sadat’s “A Letter to the President,” a drama about an official grappling with tribal laws, Angelina Jolie’s “First They Killed My Father,” an adaptation of human rights activist Loung Ung’s non-fiction book, and Annemarie Jacir’s “Wajib,” a dramedy about a father and his estranged son.

Other titles in the running include Mattie Do’s “Dearest Sister,” the story of a girl who can communicate with the dead, and Mijke de Jong’s “Layla M.” a drama about a teenage Muslim who becomes radicalized.

Check out all of the women-directed films submitted by their respective countries below. List adapted from Deadline.

Afghanistan, “A Letter to the President,” Roya Sadat, director;

Argentina, “Zama,” Lucrecia Martel, director;

Armenia, “Yeva,” Anahit Abad, director;

Australia, “The Space Between,” Ruth Borgobello, director;

Bulgaria, “Glory,” Petar Valchanov, Kristina Grozeva, directors;

Cambodia, “First They Killed My Father,” Angelina Jolie, director;

Croatia, “Quit Staring at My Plate,” Hana Jušić, director;;

Ecuador, “Alba,” Ana Cristina Barragán, director;

Georgia, “Scary Mother,” Ana Urushadze, director;

Haiti, “Ayiti Mon Amour,” Guetty Felin, director;

Hungary, “On Body and Soul,” Ildikó Enyedi, director;

Iran, “Breath,” Narges Abyar, director;

Lao People’s Democratic Republic, “Dearest Sister,” Mattie Do, director;

Luxembourg, “Barrage,” Laura Schroeder, director;

Mexico, “Tempestad,” Tatiana Huezo, director;

Netherlands, “Layla M.,” Mijke de Jong, director;

Palestine, “Wajib,” Annemarie Jacir, director;

Panama, “Beyond Brotherhood,” Arianne Benedetti, director;

Poland, “Spoor,” Agnieszka Holland, Kasia Adamik, directors;

Singapore, “Pop Aye,” Kirsten Tan, director;

Slovenia, “The Miner,” Hanna A. W. Slak, director;

Spain, “Summer 1993,” Carla Simón, director;

Switzerland, “The Divine Order,” Petra Volpe, director;

Taiwan, “Small Talk,” Hui-Chen Huang, director;

Thailand, “By the Time It Gets Dark,” Anocha Suwichakornpong, director;

Foreign-Language Oscar Race is 27 Percent Women-Directed was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Oscars: Record 92 Countries Submit for Foreign-Language Race

5 October 2017 10:12 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced on Thursday that 92 countries have submitted films for consideration in this year’s foreign-language Oscar race. The number marks a new milestone and record for the category.

Among the first-time entrants are Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal, and Syria.

Asghar Farhadi’s “The Salesman” won the prize at February’s Oscars ceremony. The director refused to attend the ceremony in protest to Donald Trump’s travel ban on a number of predominantly-Muslim countries. In his stead, Iranian-American engineer Anousheh Ansari accepted the honor.

High-profile contenders in this year’s race include Angelina Jolie’s “First They Killed My Father” from Cambodia, Michael Haneke’s “Happy End” from Austria, Sebastian Lelio’s “A Fantastic Woman” from Chile, Robin Campillo’s “Bpm (Beats Per Minute)” from France, Samuel Maoz’s “Foxtrot” from Israel, Joachim Trier’s “Thelma” from Norway, and »

- Kristopher Tapley

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Oscars 2018: The Academy Lists Record 92 Foreign Language Contenders

5 October 2017 10:03 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The final deadline for submitting each country’s film for consideration for the foreign-language Oscar was October 2. Last year 85 were finally deemed eligible by the Academy; this year the number is a record 92. Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal and Syria are first-time entrants. These films are vying for the initial shortlist of 9, and final five nominations to be announced on January 23. See the final list below.

Read More:Oscar Announces Changes for Foreign-Film Voting: Now Simpler! (Sort Of.)

The frontrunners include Sweden selected Ruben Östlund’s hilarious Palme d’Or-winner “The Square” (October 27, Magnolia Pictures), an art-world satire shot in majority Swedish with some English from stars Claes Bang, Elisabeth Moss, and Dominic West, thus giving Östlund another shot after “Force Majeure” was a surprise 2015 Oscar omission.

Germany’s choice, Fatih Akin’s “In the Fade” (December 27, Magnolia Pictures), won Best Actress for Diane Kruger at Cannes. »

- Anne Thompson

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Oscars 2018: The Academy Lists Record 92 Foreign Language Contenders

5 October 2017 10:03 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The final deadline for submitting each country’s film for consideration for the foreign-language Oscar was October 2. Last year 85 were finally deemed eligible by the Academy; this year the number is a record 92. Haiti, Honduras, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Mozambique, Senegal and Syria are first-time entrants. These films are vying for the initial shortlist of 9, and final five nominations to be announced on January 23. See the final list below.

Read More:Oscar Announces Changes for Foreign-Film Voting: Now Simpler! (Sort Of.)

The frontrunners include Sweden selected Ruben Östlund’s hilarious Palme d’Or-winner “The Square” (October 27, Magnolia Pictures), an art-world satire shot in majority Swedish with some English from stars Claes Bang, Elisabeth Moss, and Dominic West, thus giving Östlund another shot after “Force Majeure” was a surprise 2015 Oscar omission.

Germany’s choice, Fatih Akin’s “In the Fade” (December 27, Magnolia Pictures), won Best Actress for Diane Kruger at Cannes. »

- Anne Thompson

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New to Streaming: ‘The Beguiled,’ ‘City of Ghosts,’ ‘Spider-Man: Homecoming,’ and More

29 September 2017 6:05 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

The Bad Batch (Ana Lily Amirpour)

Ana Lily Amirpour’s second feature shoots for Harmony Korine meets Mad Max and would have nearly almost hit the mark were it not for the gratingly aloof attitude and the swaths of directorial license being taken. The Bad Batch — an ambitious, expansive dystopian sci-fi western which features partying, drugs, and cannibals — might come as music to the ears of diehard fans of »

- Jordan Raup

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Roya Sadat’s “A Letter to the President” Is Afghanistan’s Foreign-Language Oscar Pick

28 September 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

“A Letter to the President”: Busan Film Festival

Roya Sadat is joining the foreign-language Oscar race. Afghanistan has submitted her feature debut, “A Letter to the President,” as its pick for the upcoming ceremony, The Hollywood Reporter confirms.

The drama stars Leena Alam as a low-tier female official struggling to “observe modern laws when confronted with ancient tribal rules that condemn another woman to a brutal punishment,” the source summarizes. “Finding herself on the wrong side of the law after being arrested for her efforts, her only hope of redemption is through a direct written appeal to the president.” Sadat penned the script and served as a producer.

“A Letter to the President” made its world premiere at the Locarno Film Festival in August and will screen at the Busan Film Festival next month.

“Before the Taliban rule, I used to write scripts and direct plays in my school,” Sadat has said. “I wrote my first play when I was all of nine. But once the Taliban came, girls could not attend school. My mother and aunt were determined that our education should not suffer and so we were taught at home,” she recalled. “As soon as the Taliban left, I took up my studies and graduated in law and political science from Herat University. But my heart was in filmmaking. My uncle in Iran sent me DVDs and books on cinema and script writing.”

This marks the second time that Afghanistan has chosen a woman-directed film to rep the country at the Oscars since they started submitting in 2002. The first was Sonia Nassery’s “The Black Tulip.”

Other women-directed films in the running for foreign-language noms include Kirsten Tan’s “Pop Aye,” a drama about a man who is reunited with his childhood elephant, Angelina Jolie’s “First They Killed My Father,” an adaption of human rights activist Loung Ung’s non-fiction book, and Annemarie Jacir’s “Wajib,” a dramedy about a father and his estranged son.

Roya Sadat’s “A Letter to the President” Is Afghanistan’s Foreign-Language Oscar Pick was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Singapore Selects Kirsten Tan’s “Pop Aye” for Foreign-Language Oscar Pick

25 September 2017 1:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Pop Aye”: Giraffe Pictures

Pop Aye” will be representing Singapore in the 2018 foreign-language Oscar race, Variety reports. Written and directed by Kirsten Tan, the award-winning drama is set in Thailand and centers on a disenchanted architect who unexpectedly reunites with his long-lost childhood elephant on the streets of Bangkok. The unlikely pair embark on a road trip across the country towards the rural farm where they grew up together.

“I’ve always felt like a bit of a wanderer. Before moving to New York, where I’ve been based for the past eight years, I grew up in Singapore and lived in Jeonju and Bangkok,” Tan told us. “Across these cities, these homes, I was never sure where and when and how I fit in or belonged, so I’ve always felt for outsiders who don’t sit comfortably within one particular system.”

She explained, “For me, ‘Pop Aye’ is essentially about two wayfaring misfits — in this case, a man past his prime and his displaced street elephant — searching for meaning and belonging in space and time.”

“‘Pop Aye’ is a story of self-discovery, beautifully told by a Singapore team, including director-writer Kirsten Tan, producers Lai Weijie and Huang Wenhong, and executive producer Anthony Chen,” said Joachim Ng, director of the Singapore Film Commission. “The film has resonated with audiences both at home and internationally.”

Tan’s previous credits include shorts “Granny,” “Thin Air,” and “Cold Noodles.” “Pop Aye” is her feature debut. The film made its world premiere at Sundance this January and took home the world cinema dramatic special jury award.

Other women-directed films submitted for consideration in the foreign-language category include Angelina Jolie’s “First They Killed My Father,” an adaption of human rights activist Loung Ung’s non-fiction book, Annemarie Jacir’s “Wajib,” a dramedy about a father and his estranged son, and Agnieszka Holland’s “Spoor,” a crime drama about a woman seeking revenge after hunters kill her dog.

Singapore Selects Kirsten Tan’s “Pop Aye” for Foreign-Language Oscar Pick was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Laura Berger

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Oscars: Singapore Selects 'Pop Aye' for Foreign-Language Category

24 September 2017 10:18 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Singapore has picked Kirsten Tan’s debut feature Pop Aye to represent the country at the 2018 Oscars in the best foreign-language film category.

A tender but mysterious drama, Pop Aye debuted at the Sundance Film Festival, where it won the World Cinema Dramatic Special Jury Award for screenwriting.

Set entirely in Thailand, the film stars Thaneth Warakulnukroh as a down-and-out architect who is reunited with his childhood elephant and embarks on a road trip across the Thai countryside in search of their old home.

"Loneliness, alienation, the ache of nostalgia and the everyday absurdity of life infuse every encounter in »

- Patrick Brzeski

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Singapore Picks ‘Pop Aye’ for Foreign-Language Oscar Contention

24 September 2017 6:34 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Singapore has selected “Pop Aye” as its contender for the Academy Awards foreign-language category. Directed by Kirsten Tan, the film won the world cinema dramatic special jury award at Sundance earlier this year.

Set entirely in Thailand, the film stars Thaneth Warakulnukroh as a down-and-out architect who is reunited with his childhood elephant. They embark on a road trip across the Thai countryside in search of their old home.

“’Pop Aye’ is a story of self-discovery, beautifully told by a Singapore team, including director-writer Kirsten Tan, producers Lai Weijie and Huang Wenhong, and executive producer Anthony Chen. The film has resonated with audiences both at home and internationally,” said Joachim Ng, director of the Singapore Film Commission.

The film has recently opened theatrically in Taiwan, after releases in North America, France, the Netherlands, Singapore and Thailand. On the festival circuit it will next screen in Zurich, London, Busan and Tokyo.

Related »

- Patrick Frater

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‘Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri’ ‘Custody,’ ‘Under the Tree’ to Compete in Zurich

14 September 2017 1:04 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Martin McDonagh’s “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” Xavier Legrand’s “Custody” and Hafsteinn Gunnar’s “Under the Tree” are among the 15 feature films set to compete at the 13th Zurich Film Festival.

“Three Billboards,” a darkly comic drama with Peter Dinklage and Frances McDormand, and “Custody,” a French drama exploring domestic strife, both world-premiered at the Venice Film Festival and won best screenplay and best director awards, respectively. “Custody” also picked up the Lion of the Future for best first film.

“Under the Tree” is an Icelandic dramedy which world-premiered in Venice and is playing in Toronto, where it was just acquired by Magnolia for North American distribution.

Zurich’s competition lineup also includes Joshua Z. Weinstein’s “Menashe,” Justin Chon’s “Gook,” Cecilia Atán and Valeria Pivato’s “The Desert Bride,” Julia Solomonoff’s “Nobody’s Watching,” Kirsten Tan’s “Pop Aye,” Constantin Popescu’s “Pororoca,” Matan Yair’s “Scaffolding” and Jaron Albertin’s “Weightless »

- Elsa Keslassy

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How One Sundance Short Led to a $150,000 Production Deal (and Much More)

14 July 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The music hasn’t stopped playing for Jim Cummings. The 30-year-old writer-director-actor who won Sundance’s short film grand jury prize in 2016 seems to have found the holy grail for up-and-coming filmmakers: steady work. A former freelance line producer for College Humor in Los Angeles, Cummings recently transitioned into writing, directing and acting full time, and now has so many projects going simultaneousy that it’s hard to believe he was an unknown filmmaker just 18 months ago.

Read More‘Valerian’: How Luc Besson Made a $180 Million Indie That Can’t Fail

Shortly after winning Sundance with the 12-minute comedic drama “Thunder Road,” which takes place at a funeral and was shot in just one take, Cummings signed with Wme and landed a deal with subscription streaming company Fullscreen to shoot six additional shorts, all of which would be also shot in a single take, for $150,000. The money covered a »

- Graham Winfrey

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‘City of Ghosts’ Review: An Unspeakably Gruesome Look Past the Banality of Evil

7 July 2017 6:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Evil spreads faster than justice — that’s one of the things that makes it so sinister. It’s hard to contain, it’s always on the offensive, and it isn’t bound by the tactfulness of the truth. Love must be fought for, hate needs only to be permitted. There’s a lot to sort through in Matt Heineman’s profoundly harrowing “City of Ghosts,” the latest in a long line of recent documentaries about the atrocities that are being committed in Syria, but that grim dichotomy emerges from the chaos intact and more striking than ever. Almost everything else is lost in the rubble, sacrificed at the altar of a film whose horrors are so upsetting that they ultimately represent little more than their own madness.

City of Ghosts” may be concerned with a death-defying group of citizen journalists, but the film isn’t particularly concerned with context — it »

- David Ehrlich

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Bawdy Nun Comedy ‘The Little Hours’ Soars at Specialty Box Office

2 July 2017 10:07 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

All of a sudden the scary decline at the indie box office has reversed. Through the first five months of 2017, only four films opening limited in the standard four New York/Los Angeles theaters opened with a per theater average of $20,000. In the last four weeks, four films have opened strong as “Beatriz at Dinner” (Roadside Attractions), “The Big Sick” (Lionsgate) and “The Beguiled” (Focus) opened well and reached crossover crowds.

This week’s addition, Sundance comedy hit “The Little Hours” (Gunpowder & Sky) is the latest surprise. Loosely inspired by the bawdy 14th-century Boccaccio classic “The Decameron” (The Hollywood version starred Joan Fontaine while Pasolini shocked in 1971), this tale is set in the Medieval Italian countryside with bawdy contemporary dialogue as a randy peasant hides out at a convent after his master catches him with his wife. It did strong business at four theaters on two coasts.

This comes the »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Film Review: ‘Bad Genius’

1 July 2017 6:29 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Dramatizing the clever capers of Thai high school kids who formed an exam-cheating syndicate, “Bad Genius” deserves full marks for a whip-smart script that makes answering multiple-choice questions as nail-biting and entertaining as “Ocean’s Eleven.” Produced by blockbuster powerhouse Ghd (formerly Gth), the film is executed with that studio’s trademark technical slickness and hip style, but director Nattawut Poonpiriya (“Countdown”) also offers subtle yet stinging insight into Thailand’s class inequalities and corrupt school system.

By turning his nerdy egghead protagonists into hustler heroes, Poonpiriya calls out Asia’s rote-learning and grades-obsessed academic culture. The film, which rocked domestic box office and sold all across Asia, is screaming for a remake — and could well get noticed in the west after premiering stateside at the New York Asian Film Festival.

The film begins with a fait accompli: Exam papers of the Standard Test for International Colleges (Stic) have been leaked across several Asian countries. The »

- Maggie Lee

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‘The House’ Review: Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler’s Unfunny Comedy Is a Bizarre Endurance Test

30 June 2017 8:27 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Anyone who thinks the house always wins hasn’t seen “The House.” Not that anyone who goes to see this movie, ostensibly a comedy but in reality a bizarre endurance test, wins either — Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler’s latest is a zero-sum game in which the odds are never in your favor.

After learning that the scholarship that was going to send their daughter to college no longer exists, the happily married couple played by Ferrell and Poehler do what any caring parents would do: start an illegal casino in their friend’s (Jason Mantzoukas) house. That most of the patrons they aim to get rich off of are their neighbors and friends never seems to be an issue, nor is it the source of either comedy or tension.

Read More: Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler Make Crime Pay In First Trailer For ‘The House’ — Watch

What follows plays »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Pop Aye’ Review: A Man, an Elephant, and a Charming Love Story

29 June 2017 10:24 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Jean-Luc Godard once wrote that all one needs to make a film are a girl and a gun. Kirsten Tan’s “Pop Aye” suggests that a guy and an elephant will serve just as well.

A kind of love story, the film introduces its interspecies friends via a modified meet-cute: Thana (Thaneth Warakulnukroh) drives past the pachyderm in question one night and is instantly taken by its majestic presence, not least because he recognizes the creature from his childhood. Its current owner assures the aging architect that this elephant has had many names over the years, but he’s currently known as Chang Beer — a moniker that Thana quickly reverts back to Popeye upon buying him.

Read More: ‘Pop Aye’ Trailer: A Man Finds Himself with the Help of an Elephant in Sundance Drama — Watch

Elephants, with their imposing size and gentle nature, are among the most cinematic of all animals. »

- Michael Nordine

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Movie Review: Pop Aye proves that elephants improve everything, even sentimental road movies

29 June 2017 9:20 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Some men buy a Ferrari when they’re in the throes of a midlife crisis. Thana (Thaneth Warakulnukroh), the successful architect who’s at the center of writer-director Kirsten Tan’s wistful feature debut Pop Aye, buys an elephant. And although at first this appears to be an act of portentous quirkiness, it turns out that the elephant, Pop Aye—played by an elephant named Bong, one of three actors listed in the film’s credits—is the same one Thana grew up with on his uncle’s farm in the Thai countryside, and the duo’s long walk back to Thana’s hometown is not just a homecoming; it’s an act of penance.

Dissatisfied and feeling as though life is leaving him behind, Thana longs for a simpler time, one less beholden to modern conveniences and consumerist luxuries. The film takes a similarly leisurely tack, ambling along at »

- Katie Rife

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‘Spider-Man: Homecoming’ Review: Marvel Has Finally Started To Figure Out The Future Of Superhero Movies

29 June 2017 5:59 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When you cut through all of the spandex and special effects, superhero movies are really just high school movies with bigger muscles, bigger budgets, and bigger constraints. Indeed, the best moments in the giddy, fitfully entertaining “Spider-Man: Homecoming” are the ones that gleefully conflate the likes of Stan Lee and John Hughes, delighting in the extent to which both of their signature genres tend to revolve around emotionally unsure young people who are struggling to juggle their double lives.

“Homecoming” takes Peter Parker all the way back to his sophomore year, (re)re-introducing the endlessly rebootable web-slinger (a wide-eyed and overeager Tom Holland) as a 15-year-old pipsqueak who splits his time between anchoring the the academic decathlon team and auditioning to be an Avenger. The Queens sophomore can barely bring himself to talk to the girl he likes (Laura Harrier as Liz), but once he puts on his signature red »

- David Ehrlich

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Review: ‘Pop Aye’ is a Quaint Road Movie about Friendship and Maturation

28 June 2017 1:59 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

While much attention has currently (and rightfully) been drawn toward Bong Joon Ho’s Okja within the realm of human-and-beast cinema, Kirsten Tan’s Pop Aye is a worthy companion. Intimately canvassed and drawn with raw etchings of humanity and human error, Tan’s film is both a road movie and a buddy film, a familial drama and a study of the ever-evolving, industrialized landscapes where not everyone fits in. Through her insistent gaze on the human (and non-human) figures at its center, Tan never forgets why this story is being told. This focus makes Pop Aye a film that is heartwarming in its human-to-animal gaze, and yet crushing in its understanding of a human’s flaws.

Pop Aye Follows Thana (Thaneth Warakulnukroh), an architect who lives a somewhat dissatisfied life with his wife. There seems to be little love between them — at least not as much love as was »

- Mike Mazzanti

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014

1-20 of 59 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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