Survival of the Dead (2009) - News Poster

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Blu-ray Review: Land of the Dead – Scream Factory Collector’s Edition

Synopsis:

“A thrilling, disturbing commentary on a man-eat-man world …” – San Francisco Examiner

Legendary filmmaker George A. Romero returns to unleash another chapter in his zombie series! In this new tale of terror, Romero creates a harrowing vision of a modern-day world where the walking dead roam a vast uninhabited wasteland and the living try to lead “normal” lives behind the high walls of a fortified city. A new society has been built by a hand of ruthless opportunists, who live in luxury in the towers of a skyscraper, high above the less fortunate citizens who must eke out a hard life on the streets below. With the survival of the city at stake, a group of mercenaries is called into action to protect the living from the evolving army of the dead waiting outside the city walls. Land Of The Dead features a cast of great actors including Dennis Hopper,
See full article at The Liberal Dead »

*Updated* George A. Romero to be Honored with a Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

  • DailyDead
A cornerstone and true gentleman of the horror genre who is unfortunately no longer with us, George A. Romero's legacy will live on forever through his seminal work and infectious good nature, and those priceless traits will be commemorated today when the late Master of Horror receives a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Updated: We've now been provided with official details on the Walk of Fame ceremony, which will include guest speakers Edgar Wright and Greg Nicotero, as well as a statement from Romero's manager and friend, Chris Roe, who was instrumental in ensuring that Romero received the star that he truly deserves.

Here's what Roe, who is the director of the Romero Star Campaign, had to say about the ceremony:

"It has been a very long journey to make this day happen and so many have given their support. With George’s star ceremony on Hollywood Blvd.
See full article at DailyDead »

4 Reasons Zombie Legend George Romero Didn't Like The Walking Dead

Image Source: Getty / Laura Lezza Season eight's premiere episode of The Walking Dead was dedicated to two important people who sadly passed away this year: fallen stunt actor John Bernecker and George A. Romero, the man who first gave (undead) life to the zombie genre as a whole with his seminal 1968 flick Night of the Living Dead. As showrunner Scott M. Gimple told Entertainment Weekly, the late, great writer-director was chosen to be honored in the season opener due to his status as an inarguable icon of the genre. "The show owes a great debt to him, and popular culture owes a great debt to him," Gimple explained. But as thoughtful, appropriate, and timely as that bit of recognition may have been, Romero wasn't exactly a fan of The Walking Dead. Here's why the horror legend took umbrage at all the undead on the small-screen series. 1. He intensely disliked the format.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Special George A. Romero Tribute and Survival of the Dead Screening in Toronto

I was lucky enough to appear in the final film from George A. Romero, Survival of the Dead, and those memories will be forever etched in my brain and in my heart. It’s with a great deal of humility we… Continue Reading →

The post Special George A. Romero Tribute and Survival of the Dead Screening in Toronto appeared first on Dread Central.
See full article at Dread Central »

George Romero Was a Legend Who Never Got the Respect He Deserved

George Romero Was a Legend Who Never Got the Respect He Deserved
George A. Romero rarely had it easy. From the beginning, he faced obstacles to getting his vision on screen and condemnation once he succeeded in doing so. It took him 20 years to make his way into the big leagues, yet faced frustrating interference once he did. Yet today, the work endures. He never abandoned his vision, even when it prevented him from having an easier time of the process, and his movies, once attacked as grotesque exploitation, are now properly celebrated as landmarks of cinematic horror.

Indeed, Romero not invented more than a new and enduring kind of zombie movie when he directed “Night of the Living Dead” 50 years ago; in many ways, he invented independent horror cinema as we know it. There had been lots of off-Hollywood fright films before “Night” hit screens in 1968, of course—even some showcasing graphic if cheaply executed gore, like the Herschell Gordon Lewis flicks.
See full article at Indiewire »

Longtime George A. Romero Collaborator Vows To Finish Four Of The Director’s “Fantastic” Projects

The film industry was left in mourning on Sunday evening when horror mastermind George A. Romero passed away at the age of 77.

Often cited as the founding father of the zombie genre, Romero was a creator ahead of his time, and his living dead defied convention to inspire a generation of actors and filmmakers including Edgar Wright (see: Shaun of the Dead), Ben Wheatley, and Alice Lowe.

What makes George A. Romero’s death particularly saddening is that the illustrious filmmaker was due to attend the annual Fantasia Film Festival to promote Road of the Dead, an apocalyptic thriller from the mind of Matt Birman that blends Fast and Furious, Mad Max, and the undead. Romero had planned to produce the film, prompting Birman to relay a heartfelt message to IndieWire.

The second unit director and stuntman had worked for George A. Romero aboard Survival of the Dead, Diary of the Dead,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers George A. Romero

Chicago – The man that practically invented the modern Zombie film genre had met his own demise. Director George A. Romero passed away on July 16th, 2017, in Los Angeles. He was 77. Romero launched a whole new wave of horror with “Night of the Living Dead” in 1968, and put Pittsburgh (Pa) on the film location map.

George A. Romero Shoots a Scene for ‘Night of the Living Dead

Photo credit: Spectra Filmworks

He was born in the Bronx, New York, and graduated from the Carnegie Institute of Technology, which began his Pittsburgh connection. He stayed there afterwards, and formed Image Ten Productions, which shot commercials and (famously) a segment for the broadcast-from-Pittsburgh “Mister Rogers Neighborhood.” On a shoestring budget and using local settings, “Night of the Living Dead” was released in 1968. Directed and co-written (with John Russo) by Romero, it would immediately cause a sensation in the horror genre. After some cult
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

George Romero’s Longtime Collaborator Vows to Finish 4 Unproduced Films

George Romero’s Longtime Collaborator Vows to Finish 4 Unproduced Films
George Romero’s passing on Sunday at the age of 77 came just days before the legendary director was set to pitch his latest project, “Road of the Dead,” to financiers at Frontières, the Fantasia International Film Festival’s annual film co-production market. Romero planned to produce the zombie movie, and even had plans for four more films, according to Matt Birman, Romero’s longtime collaborator who is still attached to direct “Road of the Dead.”

Read MoreGeorge Romero, Rip: 4 Ways He Changed the Modern Horror Genre

Romero wrote all four of the movies, one of which Birman co-wrote. Two are based on novels, two are original stories; only one, a comedy, is a zombie project. Birman is determined to bring them all to the big screen.

“I will stop at nothing to get them made! For him and with him,” Birman said in an email to IndieWire. Just two weeks ago,
See full article at Indiewire »

George A Romero and the meaning of his zombies

Ryan Lambie Jul 18, 2017

As George A Romero sadly passes, we pay tribute to Night Of The Living Dead, and the meaning behind the writer-director's zombies...

In April 1968, director George A Romero threw some reels of film in the trunk of his car and took a long drive from Pittsburgh to New York. The grainy, black-and-white footage stored on those reels was little short of incendiary: then called Night Of The Flesh Eaters, Romero's film would, in time, change horror cinema forever.

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Shot on a budget of just $114,000, Night Of The Living Dead (as it was later renamed) was aggressively lo-fi: its producer, Russell Streiner, also played one of the film's first victims - he gets the immortal line, "They're coming to get you, Barbara" before
See full article at Den of Geek »

George A. Romero, 1940 - 2017

The great American director George A. Romero, best known for defining the modern genre of all things zombie, has died at the age of 77. We'll be a little less scared going to the movies now—but, worse, we'll be a little more certain stepping to the cinema's darkness that our own world, our society and politics, will no longer be challenged and questioned so astutely.As Ignatiy Vishnevetsky observed in our review of Romero's Survival of the Dead (2009):But of course "us" was always the problem, and the moral of Romero's zombie films remains: horrific situations are not as dangerous as desperate people, and desperation comes from a need to either regain or establish order. Meaning: the rules that give people a sense of security are the same ones that will destroy them. Meaning: the only inevitable factor is that society, as it exists, sets humanity up to fail.
See full article at MUBI »

Fantastic Four in the McU, Star Wars: The Last Jedi footage, Avengers: Infinity War trailer and more – Weekend News Roundup

Fantastic Four No More?

It’s been a busy weekend for those in the House of Mouse following the bi-annual D23 expo, but an announcement that many were hoping for never came to be. On the opening day, Marvel Studios had four giant statues covered in sheets, which many presumed would be the reveal of the Fantastic Four finally joining their McU-cohorts, only to have them revealed as the The Black Order in Avengers: Infinity War. Speaking with Yahoo!, Kevin Feige has said there are still no plans – as of yet – for Marvel’s First Family to join the McU. “But too many amazing things have happened over the past 17 years for me ever say never,” he said. “But for now, nothing. There’s a chance that aliens could come down from the sky right now. And we’ll use them in the movie in to save money on visual effects.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

R.I.P. Horror Legend George A. Romero: ‘Living Dead’ Director Dies At 77

Horror legend George A. Romero has sadly passed away at the age of 77. Romero died following a “brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer,” according to his producing partner Peter Grunwald.

Romero was a pioneer in the world of film in the 1960s, bringing the iconic Night Of The Living Dead to screens in 1968. The film is one of the first to feature the modern ‘zombie’, drawing inspiration from Richard Matheson’s novel ‘I Am Legend’.

Over the years, Romero directed many more movies, including The Crazies, The Dark Half, Martin, Monkey Shines, Knightriders and Bruiser. There were also the many ‘Dead’ sequels, including 1978’s Dawn Of The Dead, and 1985’s Day Of The Dead.

There was also Land of the Dead, Diary of the Dead and Survival of the Dead in more recent years.

Romero is survived by his wife and his daughter.

The post R.I.P. Horror
See full article at The Hollywood News »

George A. Romero, Father of the Zombie Movie, Has Died at 77

When you think of what a zombie movie is, you have George A. Romero to thank for that. While the term "zombie" existed previously, even in movies, it was his 1968 indie horror masterpiece, Night of the Living Dead, that gave us the iconic version of the undead monsters we know today. Romero continued from there with the satirical 1978 follow-up Dawn of the Dead plus the sequels Day of the DeadLand of the Dead, Diary of the Dead, Survival of the Dead and the upcoming Road of the Dead, which arrives next year directed by Matt Birman from Romero's script. In addition to his zombie classics, Romero also directed the horror movies Creepshow, an anthology inspired by old horror comic books, The Crazies, Monkey Shines...

Read More
See full article at Movies.com »

George Romero, Rip: 4 Ways He Changed the Modern Horror Genre

  • Indiewire
George Romero, Rip: 4 Ways He Changed the Modern Horror Genre
When George Romero died at the age of 77, he was in the process of developing more zombie movies with the insightful Diy ethos that first put him on the map nearly 50 years ago with “Night of the Living Dead.” The horror community has embraced Romero over the years, and as the decades wore on, he went from being one of the genre’s most exciting contributors to its preeminent guru. Here’s an overview of the factors that contributed his legacy.

The Modern Zombie Movie

While the initial concept of zombies dates back to a mix of African and Haitian folklore, George A. Romero cemented the modern vision with his seminal 1968 classic “Night of the Living Dead.” While the word “zombie” is never uttered in the film, his spin on the lurching undead forever changed pop culture. The director cemented this legacy with five more films in the “Night of the Living Dead” series,
See full article at Indiewire »

Legendary Horror Filmmaker George A. Romero Has Died at Age 77

Oh no, we've lost a real legend. American filmmaker George A. Romero has died at age 77, as confirmed by La Times. Romero is best known as the originator of the modern zombie movie, as the director of the original B&W zombie feature film Night of the Living Dead from 1968, as well as numerous other zombie sequels and films and series in the last 50 years. Romero died in his sleep at his home in Los Angeles with his family after a battle with lung cancer. The last film he directed was the 2009 zombie flick Survival of the Dead, and he was also involved in producing Road of the Dead and the Deadtime Stories series. Sad news. Romero is undoubtedly a filmmaking legend, having established himself as a prominent figure in the horror world for nearly five decades. His influence on the genre can be seen in so many different films over the years,
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

George A Romero dies, aged 77

Tony Sokol Jul 17, 2017

Director George A Romero, who changed horror films forever, has died at the age of 77.

The legendary director George A Romero, who changed the landscape of horror films with his low-budget, independent black and white 1968 zombie masterpiece Night of the Living Dead, has died at the age of 77.

According to a statement from his longtime producing partner, Peter Grunwald, Romero died Sunday in his sleep while listening to the soundtrack of one his favorite films, The Quiet Man from 1952, following a “brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer.” Romero was surrounded by family, his wife, Suzanne Desrocher Romero, and daughter, Tina Romero.

What a body of work he leaves behind.

Night Of The Living Dead was made by Romero and his friends in Pittsburgh on a budget of $114,000 and went on to become an iconic statement of horror, pulling in $30 million. The movie was based on Richard Matheson
See full article at Den of Geek »

R.I.P. George A. Romero (1940 – 2017)

Some sad news this evening, with Variety reporting that legendary filmmaker George A. Romero has passed away in his sleep following a brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer. He was 77 years old.

The godfather of the zombie movie, Romero made his filmmaking debut in 1968 with the hugely influential Night of the Living Dead, which was followed by the sequels Dawn of the Dead and Day of the Dead, along with the more recent Land of the Dead, Diary of the Dead and Survival of the Dead.

In addition to his zombie series, Romero directed a number of other projects, including The Crazies, Creepshow and The Dark Half. He had recently announced that he would be writing and producing another instalment of the Dead franchise, Road of the Dead, which just this past week he described as “The Fast and the Furious with zombies.”
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

George A. Romero, Pioneering Horror Director, Dead at 77

George A. Romero, Pioneering Horror Director, Dead at 77
George A. Romero, the Night of the Living Dead director who helped turn zombies into a pop culture phenomenon, died Sunday. He was 77.

The horror filmmaker died following a "brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer" while listening to the score of the 1952 film The Quiet Man, his producing partner Peter Grunwald told the Los Angeles Times.

In addition to Romero's revered, influential Zombie Trilogy – 1968's Night of the Living Dead, 1978's Dawn of the Dead and 1985's Day of the Dead – the director also helmed horror films like The Crazies,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

George A. Romero, ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Director, Dies at 77

George A. Romero, ‘Night of the Living Dead’ Director, Dies at 77
George A. Romero, who launched the zombie film genre with his 1968 “Night of the Living Dead,” died on Sunday, Variety has confirmed. He was 77.

The director died in his sleep following a battle with lung cancer, according to a statement from his manager Chris Roe.

“Legendary filmmaker George A. Romero passed away on Sunday July 16, listening to the score of ‘The Quiet Man,’ one of his all-time favorite films, with his wife, Suzanne Desrocher Romero, and daughter, Tina Romero at his side,” the statement said. “He died peacefully in his sleep, following a brief but aggressive battle with lung cancer, and leaves behind a loving family, many friends, and a filmmaking legacy that has endured, and will continue to endure, the test of time.”

Made in Pittsburgh on a budget of $114,000, “Night of the Living Dead” made $30 million and became a cult classic. Romero’s friends and associates in his Image Ten production company pooled their funds
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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