6.7/10
3,767
30 user 23 critic

One Last Thing... (2005)

R | | Comedy, Drama | 5 May 2006 (USA)
A young man with a terminal illness makes an unconventional request on local television.

Director:

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ON DISC
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
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Ricky
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Slap
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Karen Jameison
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Madelene
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Jason O'Malley
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Richie Rich
Lucas Caleb Rooney ...
State Trooper
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Arlene
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Patti (as Dana Erika Eskelson)
George Seminara ...
Mr. Helmbreck
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Amy
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Dr. Emerson
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Tai Uhlmann
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Storyline

A boy, Dylan (Michael Angarano), in grade ten with terminal cancer gets a last wish from the Wish Givers Foundation. His makes a new wish which seems a little inappropriate. As his last wish he wants to be with a super model (Sunny Mabrey) for a week alone. At first Nikki (Mabrey) has pity for him but soon it turns into love. Written by Kris Hopson

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, some drug use and sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

5 May 2006 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Az utolsó randevú  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$9,160, 7 May 2006, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$13,334
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The executive producer Mark Cuban can be seen briefly when the boys are flipping channels in Dylan's room See more »

Goofs

When Dylan sees the jumper, the camera pans down from the top of the building, showing that the lady jumped at least 15 stories; yet the roof of the SUV she lands on isn't indented at all. See more »

Quotes

["Lunatic in a dress"]: when you're born you cry and the world is happy. when you die, the world cries... and you are happy.
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Soundtracks

More Human Than Human
Written by Rob Zombie, Sean Yseult & Jay Yuenger (as Jay Yeunger)
Performed by White Zombie
Courtesy of Geffen Records
Under license from Universal Music Enterprises
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User Reviews

 
Cynthia Nixon and Michael Angarano Shine in this Tender Story
25 May 2006 | by See all my reviews

The concept for this little Indie film - the dying wish of a teenager opening spiritual doors - is far from original, but Barry Stringfellow's strong script as directed by Alex Steyermark (whose only other directorial venture was 'Prey for Rock and Roll', though he has been on the crew of some very fine films like 'Pieces of April' etc) results in a far from ordinary drama. For those who have not seen Cynthia Nixon expand beyond her 'Sex and the City' role, this performance will be enlightening! Dylan (Michael Angarano) is a young teenager diagnosed with terminal cancer, a fact that he shares with his loony buddies (Gideon Glick and Matt Bush) who support him with silly but genuine companionship. Dylan's mother Carol (Cynthia) is still reeling from her husband's death (Ethan Hawke) and facing the loss of the one remaining part of her family is devastating but her strength of character keeps a positive support for Dylan. When Dylan is informed by his doctor (Brian Stokes Mitchell) that further radiation and chemotherapy are useless, Dylan places his desire for living on one last thing...he is on a TV show where dying wishes are granted, and rather than the asking for expected fishing trip with football hero Jason (Johnny Messner), he opts for a weekend alone with supermodel Nikki Sinclair (Sunny Mabrey). Nikki, we discover, has problems and demons of her own and her agent Arlene (Gina Gershon), in trying to rescue her faltering career, advises the reluctant Nikki to visit Dylan in his home in Pennsylvania - for positive PR purposes. Once they meet Dylan is determined to have his one last thing, gains money and a room (a gift form Jason) in New York and travels with his sidekicks to the Big Apple to cash in on his prize. The Nikki he finds is the wasted girl down at heels and though she feels tenderness toward Dylan she tells him to just go home. Dylan's disease progresses to the point of final hospitalization when Nikki re-enters the sad room and changes things.

The power that changes this predictable story lies in the extraordinarily sensitive performances of Michael Angarano, who plays Dylan with a twinkle in his eye and allows us to feel his burden with resorting to bathos, and the always-impressive Cynthia Nixon whose performance as Dylan's mother is the most understated and heart wrenching on film. She owns the screen whenever she is on. The supporting cast is strong (though Gideon Glick and Matt Bush are allowed to become obnoxious and would have benefited from some stronger direction). In all, this is a striking, simple, compelling film that rises well above its premise to become an important statement about death and dying and the power of hope and love and family. Grady Harp


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