6.1/10
595
12 user 15 critic

Kedma (2002)

In May 1948, shortly before the creation of the State of Israel, hundreds of immigrants from across Europe arrive in Palestine--only to risk arrest by British troops.

Director:

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
3 wins & 5 nominations. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Kadosh (1999)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

Two sisters become victims of the patriarchal, ultra-orthodox society.

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Yaël Abecassis, Yoram Hattab, Meital Berdah
Kippur (2000)
Drama | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

The film takes place in 1973 during the Yom Kippur War in which Egypt and Syria launched attacks in Sinai and the Golan Heights. The story is told from the perspective of Israeli soldiers. ... See full summary »

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Liron Levo, Tomer Russo, Uri Klauzner
Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.8/10 X  

Itzhak Rabin's murder ended all efforts of peace, and with him the whole left wing of Israel died. The movie shows the last of his days as prime minister, and what led to his murder.

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Yitzhak Hizkiya, Pini Mittelman, Michael Warshaviak
Promised Land II (2004)
Drama | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

"Promised Land" tells the story of a group of young unwitting Estonian girls smuggled through Egypt to be auctioned off as prostitutes in Israel, and of their initiation into this trade of ... See full summary »

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Rosamund Pike, Diana Bespechni, Hanna Schygulla
Free Zone (2005)
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

Two women embark on a road trip after they are brought together by circumstance. Rebecca (Portman) flees her hotel after a fight with her mother-in-law (Maura) and hails a taxi driven by Hanna (Lazlo).

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Natalie Portman, Hana Laslo, Hiam Abbass
Disengagement (2007)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

A political drama centered around Israel's pullout from the occupied Gaza strip, in which a French woman of Israeli origin comes to the Gaza Strip to find her long ago abandoned daughter.

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Juliette Binoche, Liron Levo, Jeanne Moreau
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

A recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, who has been living in Europe for decades, accepts an invitation to receive a prize. In Argentina he finds both similarities and irreconcilable differences with the people of his hometown.

Directors: Gastón Duprat, Mariano Cohn
Stars: Oscar Martínez, Dady Brieva, Andrea Frigerio
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.7/10 X  

A man endeavors to collect memories of his grandparents who died in a concentration camp during the Holocaust.

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Jeanne Moreau, Hippolyte Girardot, Emmanuelle Devos
Tsili (2014)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.9/10 X  
Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Sarah Adler, Meshi Olinski, Leah Koenig
Eden I (2001)
Drama | Romance | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.6/10 X  

Is the story of Samantha and Dov Ernst, American Zionists who emigrated to Palestine. Kalkofsky, a German Jew and bookseller, left behind his family in Europe. He accommodates Silvia, a young revolutionary against British rule.

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Samantha Morton, Thomas Jane, Luke Holland
Carmel (2009)
Biography | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

From Israel's most important filmaker, CARMEL is Amos Gitai's (KADOSH, KIPPUR) deeply personal and resonant meditation on Jewish and Israeli identity. Using both fiction and documentary ... See full summary »

Director: Amos Gitai
Stars: Amitai Ashkenazi, Ben Eidel, Samuel Fuller
Drama | History
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

An examination of the creation of the state of Israel in 1948 through to the present day.

Director: Elia Suleiman
Stars: Ali Suliman, Maisa Abd Elhadi, Saleh Bakri
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Andrei Kashkar ...
Helena Yaralova ...
Rossa
...
The Arab Man
...
Klibanov
...
Moussa (as Juliano Mer)
Menachem Lang ...
Menachem
...
Yardena
...
Milek
...
Gideon
Roman Hazanowski ...
Roman
Dalia Shachaf ...
Dalia
...
Isha (as Karen Ben Raphael)
Sasha Chernichovsky ...
Sacha
Rawda Suleiman ...
Jaffra
Gal Altschuler ...
Ygal
Edit

Storyline

Set seven days before the creation of the state of Israel in May 1948, a small rusted ship, with a group of concentration camp survivors from Shoah, is received at the new territory with open hostility. They are met by British troops, who are shooting at them, and are trying to forbid them from disembarking. As well, the survivors are met with guns blasts being shot by the Jewish secret army, who has come to help them. Only a small group actually succeeds in landing on the small beach, where they are able to experience their first hours in Palestine. Tired and hungry, the hopeful emigrants have then to follow the Jewish forces to immediately take up arms against the Arabs. Unspoken truths from both sides explode in the violent and tragic conflict. Written by Sujit R. Varma

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | War

Certificate:

See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

| |

Language:

| | | | |

Release Date:

22 May 2002 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Kedma verso Oriente  »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

€28,383 (Italy), 9 June 2002, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$1,722, 9 February 2003, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$8,963, 23 February 2003
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Fujicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Quotes

Yanush: We don't have history, this is the fact. I don't know how to say this in Hebrew. But this is what it is. Our history is the way it is because of the Christians. We didn't want it be like this. We don't want it this way ever. They forced this on us,and we can't help it. Because of this, I am telling you, I'm against this. But I didn't say anything. She didn't exist because of me. You may find it hard to imagine that I am so intensely against this. I'm really disgusted. Think about it, what have ...
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Raises more questions than it answers.
22 December 2004 | by See all my reviews

I'm not sure I got what I was supposed to get out of this film. As a piece of cinema it was an interesting way to shoot a low budget movie. With long, almost entirely wide-angle shots that hardly move at all, (except for a magnificent opening sequence and some hand-held work later on) it's staged and paced like a series of short plays. Some of the settings are just too simplistic; visually there isn't a lot going on besides the stories of the people coming in and out of the frame. There's no main protagonist in the film; numerous characters come and go, unresolved, sharing nearly equal screen time, but never quite enough of it to make any one of them more than a two-dimensional expression of a social theme. This dispassionate attitude gives "Kedma" a very documentary feel for the first two acts. It is the third act which is confusing, and even as a Jew with family in Israel, I feel severely underqualified to interpret Amos Gitai's true intentions with it. Watched with one set of eyes, it could be called a relatively simplistic portrayal of the birth of a nation, which throws its hands up to a certain extent and spreads the blame for the current situation around widely enough to defuse the certain blowback this film was to receive from the Orthodox community. On the other hand, in blaming Christianity, the Talmud and the Messianic tradition for enforcing the diaspora mentality over the past 2000 years, it stops right on the doorstep of declaring the modern State of Israel a product of the Jews' inheritance of the Nazi mentality which drove them there in the first place. Now: This isn't what I'm saying, but it might well be what the film is saying. At the very least it states boldly that the heroic Sabra stance is nothing more than the bitter side of the slave mentality, an ongoing form of self- flagellation. Only, the movie doesn't give you any inkling that this is where it's taking you as it leads you on in documentary form; and the result is definitely shocking. This is not a movie which apologizes for any outburst of emotion; nor does it pay much homage to the myth of the historical Maccabee. In short, it is about the weak preying on the weaker. Whether or not its stance is correct or covers the entire picture, again, I'm not qualified to say. There are certainly several other sides to the conversation than the one this film snakes its way into advancing. It's not a coincidence, either, that "Kedma" is the name of the refugee ship the Jewish characters arrive on; this movie, if nothing else, is the anti-"Exodus." None of the above, by the way, makes this film particularly enjoyable to watch. But if you like watching painful and well-crafted work that makes you think, well...it's still not that enjoyable to watch, but at moments it's completely riveting.


12 of 13 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 12 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page