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British Film Institute Withdraws Harvey Weinstein’s Fellowship

6 hours ago

The British Film Institute has withdrawn Harvey Weinstein’s BFI Fellowship, its highest honor.

The organization said: “The serious and widespread allegations about Harvey Weinstein’s appalling conduct are in direct opposition to the BFI’s values. The BFI Board has met and decided to withdraw the BFI Fellowship awarded to Harvey Weinstein in 2002.” The Fellowship was awarded to Weinstein for his contribution to film.

The BFI had previously said that the Weinstein situation would not have taken as long to surface had there been more women in the industry. It said today it is bringing together industry partners to jointly develop a new set of principles to address bullying and harassment and help people in the industry to be better supported.

“We wholeheartedly support those brave enough to come forward and speak out. The film industry needs more women represented on every level, on and off screen,” the BFI said.

Numerous industry »


- Stewart Clarke

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Directors Guild of America Leaders to Address Sexual Harassment in Industry

5 hours ago

In the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal, Directors Guild of America leaders have announced that they will address the issue of sexual assault.

A DGA spokesperson made a brief announcement on Thursday: “The DGA’s National Board of Directors has a long-scheduled quarterly board meeting this Saturday, October 21 in New York City and will be addressing the very serious issue of sexual harassment in the industry.”

SAG-aftra, the Writers Guild of America West, and the Writers Guild of America East have already condemned Weinstein following explosive allegations of harassment and assault. The Producers Guild of America moved this week to start the process of expelling Weinstein as a PGA member. All four organizations promised to step up efforts to deal with the issue of sexual harassment and assault.

The DGA has about 17,000 members and represents directors and members of the directorial team, including assistant directors, unit production managers, stage managers, associate directors, »


- Dave McNary

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Quentin Tarantino on Harvey Weinstein: ‘I Knew Enough to Do More Than I Did’

25 minutes ago

In an interview with the New York Times, Quentin Tarantino has opened up about his knowledge surrounding the sexual harassment and abuse allegations that have come out surrounding his close collaborator Harvey Weinstein.

“I knew enough to do more than I did,” he said, citing several episodes involving prominent actresses. “There was more to it than just the normal rumors, the normal gossip. It wasn’t secondhand. I knew he did a couple of these things.”

“I wish I had taken responsibility for what I heard,” he added. “If I had done the work I should have done then, I would have had to not work with him.”

Tarantino admitted in the interview that he had known about the allegations long before the explosive New York Times and New Yorker reports that catalyzed the producer’s fall from grace. Tarantino’s former girlfriend, Mira Sorvino, who has since gone public with her own allegations against Weinstein, told Tarantino »


- Erin Nyren

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‘Only the Brave’ Taps Trump Digital Guru Brad Parscale (Exclusive)

57 minutes ago

Brad Parscale, the digital media director for Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, was hired by the makers of “Only the Brave” to help the action-drama appeal to red-state moviegoers, Variety has learned.

Black Label Media, the film’s financier, retained Parscale to supplement online and social media marketing efforts. Sony Pictures is distributing the $38 million production, which is on track to open to a weak $6 million when it debuts this weekend. “Only the Brave” centers on a crew of firefighters battling the Yarnell Hill Fire in June 2013. It was one of the worst wildfires in American history, having killed 19 firefighters.

“Black Label Media used several different data analytics firms and consultants to test new marketing approaches to complement Sony’s marketing efforts on the film with the goal to reach the broadest possible audience,” Black Label Media said in a statement to Variety.

Parscale advised the filmmakers to retain Marcus Luttrell, a former »


- Brent Lang

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Classics Film Fest Unspools in Colombia (Exclusive)

1 hour ago

With Sean Baker, Trey Edwards, Chris Newman, Ed Lachman, Peter Webber and Mike Hausman among its board members, a new film festival of classic films will unspool from Nov. 10 -13 in Bogota, Colombia.

Dubbed The Classics – Festival of the Films That Will Live Forever, the new film fest is founded by producer Ivonne Torres and Juan Carvajal, co-founder and artistic director of the three-year old Bogota Independent Film Festival, IndieBo.

Buoyed by sell-out crowds at IndieBo last July when the festival screened restored classics via a new pact with Martin Scorsese’s Film Foundation, Carvajal said: “I saw how these movie gems – rescued and restored with the support of the Film Foundation – deserved nothing better than to be enjoyed where they belong: the big screen.”

For many moviegoers in Bogota, it was the first time to see such classics as Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s “All About Eve,” Elia Kazan’s “On the Waterfront,” and [link=nm »


- Anna Marie de la Fuente

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Ridley Scott’s ‘All the Money in the World’ Set as Closing Night Film at AFI Fest

1 hour ago

AFI Fest has set the world premiere of Ridley Scott’s kidnapping drama “All the Money in the World” as its closing night film on Nov. 16 at the Tcl Chinese Theatre.

All the Money in the World,” the story of the 1973 kidnapping in Italy of John Paul Getty III — the rebellious teenage grandson of oil billionaire John Paul Getty, who was reluctant to pay the $17 million ransom demanded by the kidnappers. Kevin Spacey plays Getty while Michelle Williams plays the part of Gail Harris, the mother of John Paul Getty III, and Mark Wahlberg plays Getty’s adviser.

Harris and the boy’s father eventually convinced the elder Getty to pay a $2.9 million ransom, resulting in the teenager being freed after six months. Scott directed “All the Money in the World” from a David Scarpa script. Sony opens the film on Dec. 8.

Scott will be honored with a tribute prior to the screening with a moderated discussion »


- Dave McNary

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Morelia: Disney/Pixar’s ‘Coco’ Opens Wide in Mexico Before the U.S. and the World

2 hours ago

A week after “Coco,” Disney/Pixar’s Day of the Dead-themed toon, marks its world premiere at the Morelia Int’l Film Festival on Oct. 20, it rolls out across Mexico to coincide with the country’s Day of the Dead festivities, roughly a month before it bows in the U.S., quite an unprecedented move.

“It’s quite unusual but the movie is so much a love letter to the country of Mexico,” said Dave Hollis, president, theatrical distribution, The Walt Disney Studios. “It’s a celebration of the family, of Mexico’s culture, of its music,” he said, adding: “It just felt like the right thing to do.”

Coco” opens Oct. 27 at some 795 theaters in Mexico, roughly 2,000 screens. In the U.S., it debuts Nov. 22, a day before the Thanksgiving holiday, opening day and date with some other territories while others follow suit.

Another Disney label, Marvel, opens all its titles overseas before the U.S »


- Anna Marie de la Fuente

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Lumière Festival: ’Gertie the Dinosaur,’ ‘Professor Balthazar’ Reanimated After Restorations

2 hours ago

Lyon, France — The Lumière Film Festival’s International Classic Film Market put the spotlight on conservation and restoration of classic animated films on Wednesday, offering an examination of both the challenges and opportunities for cinematheques, private companies and other rights holders.

Marco de Blois, artistic director, programmer and curator at Quebec’s Cinémathèque Québécoise, presented two high-profile shorts that had long been thought lost but whose restoration he is now overseeing: the original versions of Winsor McCay’s 1914 “Gertie the Dinosaur” and Norman McLaren’s 1942 “Hen Hop.”

A version of “Gertie the Dinosaur” released in late 1914 still exists and is known as the first animated film to not only feature a dinosaur but also a character that exhibited diverse emotions.

McCay, however, had used an earlier version of the short with additional scenes in front of a live audience as part of his vaudeville act in which he interacted with Gertie. A 1913 issue »


- Ed Meza

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‘Thor: Ragnarok’ Reviews: What the Critics Are Saying

2 hours ago

Four years after his last solo film, the Norse god Thor returns to the big screen in “Thor: Ragnarok.” Currently sitting comfortably at 97% with 30 reviews on Rotten Tomatoes, most critics agree that this lighter, less brooding take on the character and his mythos is far superior to the two previous entries in the Thor series and finally gives the character a personality.

That’s not to say the film’s perfect, however. While it’s been praised for its humor, a few critics pondered if there actually might be too many jokes in the action-packed romp.

Loosely borrowing from the Norse doomsday myth, “Thor: Ragnarok” finds the hero banished to a distant planet and forced to fight gladiator battles against his “friend from work,” the Hulk, essentially giving fans a “planet Hulk” movie despite Marvel repeatedly denying that fans would see the popular storyline in a film. At the same time, the thunder »


- Matt Fernandez

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Hollywood’s New Leaders in Film

2 hours ago

Each year Variety’s New Leaders feature profiles the most prominent up-and-comers in the entertainment business. To determine this year’s worthies, Variety looked for go-getters across disciplines, from television, digital, music and film, to law and finance, as well as content creators. They were proposed by their bosses and peers who have worked with them and seen their rise. All are age 40 or under, and Variety has measured them by the progress of their career trajectories: do they take calculated risks? How fast have they risen in their companies? Are they innovative and employ solutions to problems that are creative? While it’s hard to pinpoint the “it” factor, these folks embody that intangible. The people on the list have helped build the brilliant careers of their clients, shepherded hit television shows and successful movies, created small-screen series, films and animated shows, launched digital platforms, fostered hit music, counseled top dealmakers and financed them, and are some »


- Variety Staff

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International Newswire: Mipcom Sees First Signs of Peak TV Animation

2 hours ago

In today’s International Newswire, MipJunior sees a growing flow of kids’ content coming onto the market, Chiwetel Ejiofor starts to shoot his directorial debut in Malawi, five feature debuts compete at the European Film Awards, a report finds scripted TV production in the U.S. declined last year, and Showmax is to make a Polish version of ‘Saturday Night Live.’

Cannes’ Mipcom trade-fair, which closed on Thursday, was the first in several years when unscripted was as much part of the conversation as scripted. In fact, it was a tale of three markets. If Mipcom was “bright, brisk and bustley,” as ReedMidem’s TV division director Laurine Garaude described it at her customary last day of the market wrap, MipJunior was one of the busiest events in recent years, judged by news flow, and big company presence – Mattel tub-thumping its overhaul of the “Thomas the Tank Engine” IP, for instance.

Buyers, whose »


- John Hopewell and Leo Barraclough

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Hollywood’s Most and Least Profitable Stars Revealed

3 hours ago

New data claims to name the most popular actor in Hollywood — and it might not be who you expect.

According to data compiled by PartyCasino, which analyzed box office numbers from 1980 to 2017 to determine Hollywood’s most and least profitable actors, Emilio Estevez takes the crown.

Estevez, whose Brat Pack heyday was in the ’80s and ’90s, topped the list with the best return of any top-billed male actor who has starred in at least 10 films. For every $1 spent on the leading man’s films, Estevez generated $6.70 at the box office. Jean-Claude Van Damme ranked second with $4.20 for each dollar, while other great investments were Mel Gibson ($3.50), Tyler Perry ($3), and Dudley Moore ($3).

Brad Pitt was the least profitable actor and returned only 10 cents for every $1 spent, followed by Johnny Depp (20 cents), Robert De Niro (24 cents), Hugh Jackman (25 cents), and Anthony Hopkins (26 cents).

PartyCasino had less extensive results for actresses, because, as a representative »


- Matt Fernandez

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‘I, Tonya’ Teaser: Margot Robbie Transforms Into Disgraced Figure Skater

4 hours ago

The first teaser for Margot Robbie’s “I, Tonya” proves that the actress took a no-nonsense approach to her portrayal of disgraced figure skater Tonya Harding.

The footage shows her smoking a cigarette under the arena hallway prior to competition, stubbing it out with her skate, then coming out to the ice with a dazzling smile. In a voiceover, Harding asserts that the American people want someone to love and someone to hate.

“The haters always say ‘Tonya, tell the truth.’ There’s no such thing as truth,” the voiceover continues. “I mean, it’s bulls—.”

The dark comedy centers on Harding’s attack on rival figure skater Nancy Kerrigan — aimed at breaking Kerrigan’s leg so she couldn’t compete in the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer. Harding’s involvement would eventually lead to her being stripped of her 1994 national title and a lifetime ban from the figure skating world.

“I, Tonya »


- Dave McNary

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Gotham Awards Once Again Remind of the Oscar Season Possibilities

4 hours ago

It’s rather wonderful that the New York-based Independent Filmmaker Project is always the one to get the awards season ball rolling with its nominations for the annual Gotham Awards. The organization’s process, recognizing a narrow field of categories decided by separate, tight-knit juries, is unusual, and certainly nowhere near the film Academy’s methodology. So the result is often a breath of fresh air before the inevitable avalanche of traditional fall Oscar fare begins dominating the conversation.

Movies like “Good Time” and “I, Tonya” aren’t likely to bask in the glory of best picture status, for example, but here they’re right at home. Nominations leader “Get Out” can grab more headlines before diving headlong into a season where it’s still an Oscar question mark (and perhaps the most exciting one in a year that promises to be filled with them). These and other critically acclaimed indie dramas like “Call Me by Your Name” and “The Florida Project »


- Kristopher Tapley

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Nascent Middleburg Film Festival Banks on Rural Charm, Awards Hopefuls

4 hours ago

The fifth annual Middleburg Film Festival will run from Oct. 19-22 in the picturesque community of Middleburg, Va. Festival directors Sheila Johnson and Susan Koch boast of their setting, an hour from Washington, D.C., and 30 minutes from Dulles Intl. Airport, as well as a starry slate of Oscar contenders and provocative indie gems.

“We’re situated in horse and wine country, which makes for a very intimate setting,” says Johnson, who founded the festival in 2012. Since when it has grown considerably.

“We’re attracting roughly 4,000 visitors, and we’re a completely walkable festival,” Koch says. “We’ll be screening 25 films at various venues all across town, and even if we don’t have a traditional theater in Middleburg, that hasn’t stopped us from putting on a terrific event.  Everything from the town’s community center to the library to the performing arts school is retrofitted with Dcp technology for the screenings. When [link=nm »


- Nick Clement

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Makeup-Hair Designer Specializes in Bruising Looks for ‘Blade Runner 2049,’ ‘Stronger’

4 hours ago

This is a busy year for makeup and hair designer Donald Mowat, who worked on two major releases: “Blade Runner 2049” and “Stronger.”

Mowat was a big fan of Ridley Scott’s original “Blade Runner,” released in 1982, so he was psyched when helmer Denis Villeneuve asked him to lead the makeup department for the sequel — a revisiting of the L.A.-based futuristic tale set 30 years later. Mowat overcame initial anxiety over the epic scope of the project and was happy to reteam with the director and cinematographer Roger Deakins, with whom he had worked on “Sicario” and “Prisoners” as well.

Blade Runner 2049” required every type of makeup application: character, aging, beauty and fantasy. Mowat and Villeneuve met to discuss initial concepts. The designs found inspiration in many sources, including Alexander McQueen’s fashions, Jack Nicholson’s torn nose in “Chinatown” and Rutger Hauer’s bloodied face in the original “Blade Runner.”

Some design »


- Marj Galas

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Daniel Dae Kim, Grace Park, Justin Chon Among 16th Annual Unforgettable Gala Honorees (Exclusive)

5 hours ago

The 16th Annual Unforgettable Gala, the longest-running celebration of Asian American trailblazers in the entertainment industry, has selected Leonardo Nam, Ross Butler, Awkwafina, Justin Chon, Daniel Dae Kim, Grace Park and Dr. Mike Hong as its honorees, Variety has learned exclusively.

Nam, who currently stars in HBO’s sci-fi western drama “Westworld” is being named “Actor of the Year,” while Butler will be honored with the male breakout award for his work on Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why” and the CW’s “Riverdale” and rapper and comedian Awkwafina will receive the female breakout award.

Chon, who is perhaps best known for his role in “Gook” but has also appeared this year in “Dr. Ken” and can be seen next year in “Deception,” is being honored with the Vanguard Award. Former “Hawaii Five-0” stars Kim and Park will be recognized for exemplifying the “devotion and the spirit of ‘The Ultimate Drive’ in their careers” with presenting sponsor BMW’s Ultimate »


- Danielle Turchiano

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Film Review: ‘Thor: Ragnarok’

5 hours ago

Hey, comicbook fans, it’s another Thor movie, and that can only mean one thing: It’s almost time for another Avengers movie! While you wait, Disney and Marvel Studios hope to loot another half-billion dollars or so from the world’s wallets with this outlandish amuse bouche featuring the God of Thunder and his Abs of Steel, with yet another confusing plot crudely bastardized from Norse mythology in which most of the action takes place on a parallel world you care nothing about.

Like Thor’s two previous solo outings (definite low points in the Marvel oeuvre), this one is pretty much skippable, although it’s not without its pleasures — most notably, the fact that Thor’s not so solo this time around, with cameos/co-starring opportunities for the Hulk, Doctor Strange and a few leftover bits of Tony Stark’s wardrobe (including a retro Duran Duran T-shirt that’s good for a laugh). And while it »


- Peter Debruge

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Playback: Andy Serkis on ‘Breathe,’ ‘Star Wars’ and ‘Mourning’ for Caesar

6 hours ago

Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

Whether you see his face in films like “The Prestige” or “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” or you don’t in franchises like “The Lord of the Rings” and “Planet of the Apes,” where his passion for performance-capture is on full display, Andy Serkis continues to blaze a trail through the industry. This year he’s somewhat ubiquitous, starring in the third “Apes” installment as well as jumping behind the camera for his directorial debut “Breathe.” He’ll also show up later this year as the mysterious Supreme Leader Snoke in “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” and again early next year in Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther.”

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

Breathe” came to Serkis through Jonathan Cavendish, his partner »


- Kristopher Tapley

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Danielle Darrieux, French Star of ‘La Ronde,’ Dies at 100

6 hours ago

Danielle Darrieux, one of the great French movie stars, died Wednesday in Bois-le-Roi, France. She was 100.

The star of director Max Ophuls’ classic early ’50s films “La Ronde” and “The Earrings of Madame de…” and Anatole Litvak’s 1936 “Mayerling” also made some films in Hollywood and, late in life, starred, with an all-star cast of fellow French female movie stars, in Francois Ozon’s “8 Femmes.”

In Ozon’s 2002 delightful musical mystery-comedy “8 Femmes,” the actress played Deneuve’s mother again, starring along with Isabelle Huppert, Emmanuelle Beart, Fanny Ardant, Virginie Ledoyen and Ludivine Sagnier. The entire cast received a Silver Bear at the Berlin Film Festival for outstanding artistic achievement as well as the European Film Award for best actress.

Born in Bordeaux, Darrieux was raised in Paris. At the Paris Conservatory she studied the cello and piano.

Darrieux auditioned for a secondary role as a willful teenager in the 1931 musical “Le Bal” when she was only 14, and »


- Carmel Dagan

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