13 articles


‘Pacific Rim 2’ Director Teases Future Crossover With King Kong, Godzilla Franchise

11 hours ago | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Judging by its trailers, the “Pacific Rim” sequel looks amazing, with “Force Awakens” star John Boyega joining as the new lead — but fans might already have a reason to look forward to the franchise’s films down the line. With “Pacific Rim: Uprising” coming out next March, director Steven S. DeKnight shared with Collider that the movie might be followed up with a full-on crossover with King Kong and Godzilla joining in on the action. “I won’t say there’s an Easter Egg but there’s been a lot of discussion about that possibility ,” DeKnight told Collider. »


- Sean Burch

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‘Avengers 4’ Is Bringing Back ‘Iron Man 3’ Whiz Kid Ty Simpkins

12 hours ago | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

We already know the cast of Avengers: Infinity War will be massive by bringing in all the surviving superheroes from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, and it sounds like the cast of Avengers 4 will be bringing even more characters into the mix outside of all the Avengers and Guardians of the Galaxy. It’s not often […]

The post ‘Avengers 4’ Is Bringing Back ‘Iron Man 3Whiz Kid Ty Simpkins appeared first on /Film. »


- Ethan Anderton

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Wong Kar-Wai Says Young Filmmakers Are "Less Competitive"

15 hours ago | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Wong Kar-Wai said the opening up of the Chinese film market is providing immense opportunity for young directors, but cautioned those coming up against being complacent, as competition will be fierce in the future.

Wong — who was honored with the headlining prize at the Lumiere Film Festival, headed by Cannes fest director Theirry Fremaux — made the comments while discussing the business in Hong Kong and China.

Wong, born just before the Cultural Revolution in China, was raised in Hong Kong and came of age as a filmmaker in the 1980s and 1990s. He compared the current climate in China »


- Rhonda Richford

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Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread’: A New, Detailed Synopsis Revealed

18 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Is there a film obsessive cinephiles are looking forward to more this holiday season than Paul Thomas Anderson‘s upcoming movie “Phantom Thread“? The answer is, quite obviously, no. Despite the mixed reaction his last movie, “Inherent Vice,” received back in October of 2014, Anderson is still viewed as one of the greatest working filmmakers in the world today.  “The Phantom Thread” reteams him with, newly retired, “There Will Be Blood” star Daniel Day-Lewis.

Continue reading Paul Thomas Anderson’s ‘Phantom Thread’: A New, Detailed Synopsis Revealed at The Playlist. »


- Jordan Ruimy

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‘Boo! 2’ Drives to $21 Million Opening While Other New Releases Crash

17 hours ago | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

In a sluggish weekend for the box office, the only success to be found is Lionsgate’s “Boo! 2,” the ninth film in Tyler Perry’s “Madea” franchise. The $20 million film is on pace to hit its projected target with a $21 million opening from 2,388 screens. The horror comedy made $7.5 million on Friday, including $760,000 from Thursday previews.

Tyler Perry has never been a critical fave, and “Boo! 2” is no exception as it received an abysmal 8 percent on Rotten Tomatoes. But his legions of fans were not disappointed, bestowing an A- on CinemaScore. »


- Jeremy Fuster

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Tony Zierra to Follow up ‘Filmworker’ with New Stanley Kubrick Doc about ‘Eyes Wide Shut’

21 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lyon  — Tony Zierra, the director of this year’s critically acclaimed Cannes screener “Filmworker” – about Leon Vitali, who served for decades as Stanley Kubrick’s right-hand man – is working on a followup Kubrick documentary about the making of the 1999 drama “Eyes Wide Shut,” starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman.

Zierra was in Lyon this week for a screening of “Filmworker” at the Lumière Film Festival, where the documentary has generated massive buzz.

Speaking to Variety about his next project, “SK13,” (“Eyes Wide Shut” being Kubrick’s 13th film), Zierra explained that he was originally working on that documentary when he met Vitali and decided to put it aside and do “Filmworker” first.

Zierra is now returning to his initial project, which promises an inside look at what is arguably  Kubrick’s most controversial work, due in part to the director’s death during post-production.

“The one movie that I feel is the wrinkle in Kubrick’s filmography »


- Ed Meza

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William Friedkin on the Power of Film, Capital Punishment and his Recklessness on ‘The French Connection’

21 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lyon  — Director William Friedkin, maker of “The French Connection” and “The Exorcist,” in Lyon for a showcase of his work, proved his storytelling prowess at a master class on Thursday as he captivated the audience with anecdotes of his illustrious career.

Particularly moving was the account of his first work, the 1962 documentary “The People vs. Paul Crump.”

After meeting the chaplain of the Cook County jail and learning about a young black man on death row named Paul Crump that both the pastor and the warden believed to be innocent, Friedkin visited the inmate and likewise became convinced of his innocence. He set out to make a documentary about the case in the hope of saving his life.

“A confession was beaten out of him by the Chicago police, which was done routinely in those days. If there was an African American accused of a crime they would go into the African American community and round up the »


- Ed Meza

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Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’

21 October 2017 12:24 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lyon The Lumière Festival honored Wong Kar-wai with the Lumière Award on Friday following a wide-ranging discussion between the Chinese filmmaker and the festival director Thierry Frémaux about his life and career.

Asked about his early influences during the master class, held in front of a packed house at the majestic Théâtre des Célestins ahead of the evening’s award ceremony, Wong said he moved with his family from Shanghai to Hong Kong as a child in 1962 before the onset of the Cultural Revolution. Since the family had no friends or relatives in Hong Kong and did not speak Cantonese, Wong regularly went to the movies with his mother.

“It’s all because of my mother. My mother is a big film buff – she enjoyed watching movies. The fact that we didn’t have any friends and relatives in this new city, the only thing she liked to do was take me to the cinema. We spent almost »


- Ed Meza

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Guillermo Del Toro Is Making a Documentary About Director Michael Mann

23 hours ago | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

There seems to be something of a trend at the moment for directors making films about other directors. Not only has Susan Lacy directed a movie called ‘Spielberg’ about the life and work of Stephen Spielberg, there was also ‘De Palma’ directed by Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow. Now there is news of another documentary film about a director in the works. Thierry Fremaux, the Cannes chief, was presenting a new director’s cut of ‘Heat’ recently at the Lumiere Film Festival. While doing so, he took the opportunity to announce that Guillermo del Toro is currently working on a documentary

Guillermo Del Toro Is Making a Documentary About Director Michael Mann »


- Nat Berman

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Josh Brolin Mourns ‘Deadpool 2’ Stuntwoman’s Death: It Was an ‘Absolute Freak Accident’

13 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Josh Brolin spoke about the death of stuntwoman Joi “S.J.” Harris while working on “Deadpool 2” in an interview Saturday after the film wrapped shooting.

“We had somebody pass away on ‘Deadpool 2’ and it was an absolute freak accident,” Brolin told The Associated Press in an interview about his new film “Only the Brave.” Harris died in August after she lost control of her motorcycle and crashed into a Vancouver building.

“The woman was such a wonderful woman … it wasn’t even a stunt, it was a freak accident,” the actor, who plays Cable, said. “It was a terrible thing that happened. Was it a nano-decision that she made in order to save the bike and this, you know what I mean? You could look into it all [these ways], but sometimes things just happen that are tragic.”

According to reports, Harris, the first female African-American road racer, was brought on at the last minute to fill »


- Erin Nyren

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The Death of Stalin review – more bleak than black

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Armando Iannucci’s comic-book adaptation, about the aftermath of the despot’s death, is less caustic than his usual offerings

Known and loved for lacerating political satires The Thick of It, In the Loop and Veep, Armando Iannucci has a gift for skewering incompetent authority figures – locating the humour in their bumbling errors – as well as for truly creative, foul-mouthed insults. Iannucci and Soviet Russia; on paper, it’s a match made in heaven – both an opportunity to capitalise on anti-Russia sentiment and a chance to jab one of history’s most notorious autocrats in the ribs at a time when dictatorial, power-drunk figures are actually in power. A shame, then, that it doesn’t jab hard enough.

The film is adapted from Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin’s graphic novel, in which Stalin’s sudden death in 1953 serves as a catalyst for action, with the neurotic, paranoid acting general »

- Simran Hans

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DVD reviews: Gifted; Alone in Berlin; The Mummy; Slack Bay and more

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Marc Webb’s child-custody weepie has an honest edge, while Brendan Gleeson and Emma Thompson raise the stakes of a Nazi resistance drama

My esteemed colleague Mark Kermode often talks of Altitude Adjusted Lachrymosity Syndrome (Aals), the tendency we have to vulnerably cry buckets while watching films – often wholly unremarkable ones – on planes. That would handily explain my reaction to Gifted (Fox, 12), a slick, soap-scrubbed and shamelessly tear-engineered child-custody drama, if not for the annoying detail that it caught me very much on terra firma. Perhaps it’s not that unremarkable after all.

A sore streak of honest feeling runs through The Amazing Spider-Man director Marc Webb’s weepie; ditto the fresh, true performances from Chris Evans, as the adoring but no-bullshit uncle and guardian of a seven-year-old maths genius, and from McKenna Grace, beguiling but never cutesily camera-trained as the tyke in question. Together, they have an utterly credible, »

- Guy Lodge

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My Little Pony: The Movie review – Rainbow Dash to the rescue!

1 hour ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This big-screen plastic toy spinoff may be a shrill assault on the senses but at its heart is a thoroughly positive message

At the chewy, candy core of this assaulting, shrill, Skittles-hued headache is a well-meaning treatise on solidarity and female friendship. Ponies Twilight Sparkle, Applejack, Rainbow Dash, Pinkie Pie, Fluttershy and Rarity must pool their powers to save the kingdom of Equestria from all-encroaching evil and evil’s henchwoman, Tempest Shadow (Emily Blunt). Still, at least the all-star cast – including Taye Diggs as smooth-talking alleycat Capper and Orange Is the New Black’s Uzo Aduba as Queen of the Hippogriffs – seem to have fun. Music fans might also stifle a chuckle upon seeing the pop star Sia in pony form, nose-skimming fringe and all.

Continue reading »

- Simran Hans

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Antalya Festival: Aida Begic on ‘Never Leave Me,’ Shooting Movies with Kids

1 hour ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Antalya, Turkey — Aida Begic spent months working with aid groups and displaced Syrian families and orphans in preparing her portrait of the refugee crisis, as seen from the eyes of children in “Never Leave Me.” The subject is well-known to the Bosnian survivor of the Balkan War, whose films often focus on the youngest victims and their remarkable buoyancy. Variety chatted to Begic as “Never Leave Me” opened the 54th Antalya Festival.

How did your own experience lead you to making such incisive portraits of children as survivors?

I was 16 when our war happened. I’m always very sensitive to this problem and I always will be to the suffering of innocents. I know that there are many dimensions and kids they have to stay kids even in the worst circumstances. So to talk about what’s happening with children and their dreams and their emotions, it’s probably something that will give us a different perspective »


- Will Tizard

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Antalya Festival Opens with Walken, Syrian Refugee Crisis-themed ‘Never Leave Me’

2 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Antalya, Turkey — Turkey’s newly reformatted Antalya fest launched Saturday in the coastal resort town under balmy skies, striking a hopeful note in a region beset by crises.

Opening with a stirring look at children caught up in the Syrian refugee exodus, Aida Begic’s “Never Leave Me,” the gala for the fest’s 54th edition hosted some 3,000 of guests, serenaded by the Antalya State Symphony Orchestra.

As Begic noted to the well-heeled audience at the Antalya Expo Center, lessons from her film, in which real refugees play characters based on themselves, “we don’t all speak the same language, but we can still live together in peace and harmony.”

Several Americans were almost surprised to find themselves in town – many were unsure until the last minute whether the current U.S.-Turkish visa spat would prevent them from entering the country but Turkish airports appeared to be issuing visas upon arrival to U.S. visitors »


- Will Tizard

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‘Summer 1993’s’ Carla Simón Talks About, Summer, Kids, Oscars

2 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Barcelona  — A coming-of-age told from the perspective of a six-year-old orphan who is forced to live with her aunt and uncle, “Summer 1993” is the first feature of Barcelona-based Carla Simón. Received by critics as a luminous, moving –but never sentimental– debut – Variety called it a “delicate sleeper” – that represents Spain in the foreign-language Oscar race, “Summer 1993” that broke out at the Spanish box office for co-producer/distributor Avalon Films to a highly creditable (€970,000) $1.2 million in Spain this summer, making it one of the most successful Spanish first features in recent years. It is now cumulating plaudits – critical, awards – on the international film circuit. Produced by Valérie Delpierre’s Inicia Films in co-production with Avalon and sold by Warsaw-based New Europe Film Sales, “Summer 1993” premiered at Berlin’s Generation Kplus section), winning the first feature jury’s top prize, scooped the Golden Biznaga at Spain’s Málaga Film Festival and has just made the five-pic cut for the »


- Emilio Mayorga

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Turkish Cinema: The New Generation – Kivilcim Akay, Director ‘I am Also Here’

2 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Turkish cinema has become a regular fixture on the international festival circuit these days, represented most recently by first time features, such as Ceylon Ozcelik’s media censorship-themed “Inflame,” which bowed this year in Berlin, and Emre Yeksan’s dystopian drama “The Gulf” which launched from Venice.

Variety has profiled several other directors, writers and producers who signal that a new generation is emerging within Turkey’s vibrant, albeit turbulence-riddled, film scene.

Kivilcim Akay in 2008 got her degree in fine arts from Akdeniz Univerisity in Antalya and went to work in the advertising field, eventually starting her own advertising and production company in 2011. She produced and directed Turkish fashion doc series “100 Years of Fashion” which in 2013 aired on pubcaster Trt. In 2014 followed “My Wish is Peace” in which children in areas affected by the ongoing 30-year-old Kurdish-Turkish conflict express their desires for resolution. That doc world-premiered at the Istanbul film fest and circulated internationally.

Akay is currently »


- Nick Vivarelli

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Turkish Cinema: The New Generation – Su Baloglu, Producer ‘The Island’

2 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Turkish cinema has become a regular fixture on the international festival circuit these days, represented most recently by first time features, such as Ceylon Ozcelik’s media censorship-themed “Inflame,” which bowed this year in Berlin, and Emre Yeksan’s dystopian drama “The Gulf” which launched from Venice.

Variety has profiled several other directors, writers and producers who signal that a new generation is emerging within Turkey’s vibrant, albeit turbulence-riddled, film scene.

Su Baloglu was born in Famagosta, Cyprus, in 1987. After studying film in Canada and Istanbul she co-founded her production company Su Film and this year co-directed and produced documentary “Her First” about the challenges faced by women filmmakers in Turkey. Baloglu is co-founder of the Istanbul chapter of New York-based women filmmakers collective Film Fatales.

The Island,” which has been selected by the Antalya Film Forum’s documentary pitching section, is the Cyprus-set “story of four women who desperately want to literally break the boundaries »


- Nick Vivarelli

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Turkish Cinema: The New Generation – Ender Ozkahraman, Director ‘Ugly Duckling’

2 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Turkish cinema has become a regular fixture on the international festival circuit these days, represented most recently by first time features, such as Ceylon Ozcelik’s media censorship-themed “Inflame,” which bowed this year in Berlin, and Emre Yeksan’s dystopian drama “The Gulf” which launched from Venice.

Variety has profiled several other directors, writers and producers who signal that a new generation is emerging within Turkey’s vibrant, albeit turbulence-riddled, film scene.

Ender Ozkahraman, whose first feature “Ugly Duckling” will world premiere in the Antalya fest’s competition, worked for many years as a graphic novelist and cartoonist for prominent Turkish satirical magazine LeMan before veering into screenwriting and eventually directing a short documentary in 2015 titled “A Comedian Offended,” about a stand-up comic who fights the negativity of violent clashes between Turkish government forces and Kurdish insurgents with jokes.

Ugly Duckling,” which Ozkahraman wrote and directed, is a drama that mixes the desire which a young woman named »


- Nick Vivarelli

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Turkish Cinema: The New Generation – Andac Haznedaroglu, Director ‘The Guest’

2 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Turkish cinema has become a regular fixture on the international festival circuit these days, represented most recently by first time features, such as Ceylon Ozcelik’s media censorship-themed “Inflame,” which bowed this year in Berlin, and Emre Yeksan’s dystopian drama “The Gulf” which launched from Venice.

Variety has profiled several other directors, writers and producers who signal that a new generation is emerging within Turkey’s vibrant, albeit turbulence-riddled, film scene.

Andac Haznedarolglu is an experienced TV director with several hit shows under her belt. She is now at her second feature film with “The Guest,” which is world premiering in the Antalya fest competition. Her first feature was local romcom “Everything for Love.”

“The Guest” is a refugee drama toplining Jordanian star Saba Mubarak as a Syrian named Meryem fleeing from war-torn Aleppo with two children whose parents have perished.

“This is a story that has changed my life,” she says, noting »


- Nick Vivarelli

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