13 articles


Box Office: ‘Kingsman: The Golden Circle’ Dominates With $40 Million

23 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Spy comedy “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” is heading for a solid $40 million opening weekend at 4,003 North American sites, estimates showed Saturday.

The third weekend of horror blockbuster “It” continues to scare up impressive business with a projected $30 million at 4,007 locations, followed by the launch of Warner Bros.’ animated comedy “The Lego Ninjago Movie” with about $21 million at 4,047 locations — well under recent forecasts. Still, with three films over $20 million, the overall box office represents a continued rebound for the movie business following a dismal late summer.

Independent horror movie “Friend Request” is showing little traction in its launch weekend with an estimated $2.2 million at 2,550 venues. Jake Gyllenhaal’s “Stronger,” a biopic on Boston Marathon bombing survivor Jeff Bauman, is opening with a moderate $1.6 million at 574 sites for Roadside Attractions.

Fox’s “Kingsman: The Golden Circle” is performing in line with expectations, two years after “Kingsman: The Secret Service.” The sequel brings back original stars Taron Egerton, Colin Firth »


- Dave McNary

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'Star Wars: The Last Jedi' Wraps Post-Production, Says Rian Johnson

22 September 2017 11:51 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Star Wars is over. Or, at least, the latest episode is.

Director Rian Johnson took to Instagram to reveal that post-production on Star Wars: The Last Jedi has officially been completed, 19 months after shooting began.

Accompanying a shot of the post-production team on the movie, Johnson wrote, "Aaaand that's a wrap on the hardest working post production team in the galaxy. Going to miss sitting in dark rooms with these goobers."

It's also a wrap of Johnson sharing Instagram teases of the post-production process on the movie, which have included shots of explosions, space bears »


- Graeme McMillan

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Judge Denies Director’s Bid to Seize and Destroy ‘The Professor and the Madman’

22 September 2017 3:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

A judge on Friday denied director Farhad Safinia’s request to seize and destroy a producer’s cut of “The Professor and the Madman,” the Mel Gibson film about the Oxford English Dictionary.

Safinia says he was thrown off the film after Voltage Pictures refused his request to shoot five additional days at Oxford University. He filed a lawsuit accusing Voltage of defamation and copyright infringement, and asked for a restraining order to block Voltage from shopping the film to distributors.

But in her ruling Friday, Judge Consuelo Marshall rejected the request, saying Safinia had not demonstrated a likelihood of prevailing on the merits of the dispute. Safinia claims that he owns the copyright to the September 2016 version of the screenplay, and that he never subsequently assigned the rights to Voltage.

Voltage counters that Safinia had already given up his copyright to earlier drafts of the film’s screenplay under a “work made for hire” agreement, and »


- Gene Maddaus

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Gal Gadot Parts Ways With Manager (Exclusive)

22 September 2017 7:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Gal Gadot has parted ways with management company Untitled Entertainment, The Hollywood Reporter has exclusively learned.

After her fan-favorite turn as Themysciran princess Diana in last year’s Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, the Israeli actress took center stage in Wonder Woman, the most successful movie of the summer — a lone bright spot that saw director Patty Jenkins shatter box-office records for female filmmakers on the film's way to earning more than $800 million worldwide.

Gadot will return as Wonder Woman in the DC Comics team-up Justice League and has signed on for the Wonder Woman sequel. In addition, »


- Rebecca Sun

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Oscars Overhaul and Open Up Foreign Language Voting Process

22 September 2017 6:02 PM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

In advance of what is expected to be a record year for entries in the Oscars’ Best Foreign Language Film category, the Academy has made significant changes in the voting process used to select nominees. In a Thursday afternoon email to all Southern California-based members of the Academy, the organization used the subject line “Come see the world with us!” and invited the members to “help us choose the next foreign language film award nominees,” also linking to a page that described the new voting system. In the biggest change, the color-coded screening groups have been eliminated. In the past, »

- Steve Pond

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Film Review: ‘Leatherface’

6 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Considering the game-changing stature of Tobe Hooper’s 1974 original in the annals of horror cinema, it’s odd that “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” has had such a peculiar, erratic life in franchise terms. Odder still then that after so many re-inventions of this particular wheel, to varying artistic and box-office rewards, that “Leatherface” should quietly premiere on DirecTV a month before being dumped into a handful of U.S. theaters on Oct. 20.

Written by Seth M. Sherwood and directed by the French duo Julien Maury and Alexandre Bustillo (“Inside”), this “origin story” is a somewhat mixed bag. But it’s also an earnest and well-crafted attempt at course-correction, straying from stock slasher recyclage to provide a different story that actually connects a few dots in the very tangled cinematic “Chainsaw” universe to date. Particularly given the angry popular rejection just handed genre rule-breaker “Mother!,” you’d think this respectable addition to an uneven but name-brand horror pic »


- Dennis Harvey

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In Between review – the struggle of free spirits trying to fly

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Three female flatmates in Tel Aviv fight the constraints of their Muslim faith and families in an inspiring directorial debut

This bittersweet debut feature from Maysaloun Hamoud is a spiky treat, an empowering tale of three Palestinian women living in Tel Aviv, each fighting their own battles for independence and fulfilment. Balancing tragicomic relationship blues with sharp sociopolitical observation, Hamoud’s slyly subversive drama draws us deep into an often hidden world. As the title suggests, these women occupy a liminal space, caught between freedom and repression, religion and secularism, the past and the future. Theirs is a world in flux, in which the drugs and partying of the underground scene stand in stark contrast to the strict hypocrisies that dominate the cultural landscape. As one of them tells her devout father: “Some people live in palaces, but God knows what their life is like inside…”

Laila (Mouna Hawa) is a force of nature, »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Film Review: Stephen King’s ‘1922’

6 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Every generation gets its own version of “The Tell-Tale Heart,” but “1922” — writer-director Zak Hilditch’s workmanlike adaptation of the novella by Stephen King — almost certainly is the first iteration of Edgar Allen Poe’s classic story to include voracious rodents, hapless cows and a Bonnie and Clyde-like pair of young bank robbers.

Hilditch deserves credit for generating and sustaining suspense throughout a slow-burning drama that is more fatalistically tragic than traditionally horrific, and for delivering the goods when old-fashioned shocks are called for. In fact, it’s no small measure of the movie’s overall effectiveness that one can easily overlook, if not unreservedly forgive, a few fleeting moments when vermin balanced on their hind legs are only marginally scarier than the rodent gourmet in “Ratatouille.”

Right from the start, we know things aren’t going to turn out well for Wilfred James (Thomas Jane), a haggard and haunted fellow who checks into an inelegant Omaha »


- Joe Leydon

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San Sebastián: Suárez, López, Verdaguer Board ‘7 Reasons’ (Exclusive)

7 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

San Sebastian –Emma Suárez, star of Pedro Almodóvar’s ”Julieta” and Michael Franco’s “April’s Daughter,” Sergi López, who toplined Guillermo del Toro’s “Pans Labyrinth,” and David Verdaguer, who features in Spain’s Oscar entry  “Summer 1993,” are on board black comedy “7 Reasons to Run Away,” a first feature co-directed by Esteve Soler, Gerard Quinto, and David Torras.

Suárez is a member of the 65th San Sebastian Festival’s main jury, presided by John Malkovich.

Barcelona-based, young companies Compacto and No Hay Banda are re-teaming on “7 Reasons” after having co-produced Sergi Pérez’s “The Long Way Home,” which won best Catalan-language feature at Catalonia’s Gaudi Awards.

Its screenplay is penned by playwright and director Esteve Soler, whose last three stage plays (“Against Progress,” “Against Democracy” and “Against Love”) have been staged in more than twenty countries.

“7 Reasons” offers “a very contemporary canvas of society structured through seven different stories tackling the family, private »


- Emilio Mayorga

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King Arthur; Baywatch; The Red Turtle; 3 Hearts and more – review

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Guy Ritchie’s sword-and-sorcery epic and a remake of a 90s camp classic fall flat while there are delights for young and old alike elsewhere

As the days shorten, outfits lengthen and autumn greets us with chilly reserve, Hollywood is still poring over the results of its summer autopsy – a grim one, with the season ending in its lowest Us box office total in a decade. As fingers of blame are pointed in any number of directions, from Netflix to the political administration, the slump is more easily explained in a few individual cases; even the least discerning viewers couldn’t find much to love in films as obnoxiously misconceived as King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (Warner, 15) and Baywatch (Paramount, 15).

The former sees Guy Ritchie trying out the same trick he pulled with Sherlock Holmes – meshing the lairy contemporary laddishness of his geezer crime flicks to an older-school English storytelling institution. »

- Guy Lodge

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Borg vs McEnroe review – a five-set thriller of a film

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Sverrir Gudnason is superb as the ice-cool Swede struggling to contain a cauldron of emotion – and Shia Labeouf’s not bad either as his voluble opponent

A tale of sporting rivalry is given a brooding, introspective Scandinavian twist by Janus Metz, hitherto best known for his award-winning documentary Armadillo. Stoic, seemingly unflappable Björn Borg (Sverrir Gudnason) and volatile, temperamental brat John McEnroe (Shia Labeouf) competed for the Wimbledon title in 1980. On paper, it was a clash of opposites. But in fact, this film argues that the two men had more in common than anyone suspected at the time. Ice-man Borg, the main focus of this film, was in fact a volcano; his obsession with detail, his superstitions, were all part of the meticulous control mechanism he constructed to prevent the eruptions of anger that so tarnished McEnroe’s early reputation.

Whether or not you know the outcome, this is a cracking watch. »

- Wendy Ide

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Kingsman: The Golden Circle review – sneering spy spoof sequel

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Requiring Taron Egerton to act proves a stretch too far for this unpleasant, poorly plotted follow-up

This is a code-red warning. I repeat, code red. You may be in the mood for a piece of trashy fun this weekend. You might have embraced the slick anarchy of the first Kingsman movie. But on no account let that persuade you to part with your money for a ticket to this sour-spirited and glib sequel. Taron Egerton returns as Eggsy, newest recruit of the elite secret agency Kingsman. He does a decent job of the two key requirements of the role: wearing suits and hitting people. But an early plot twist requires him to emote, at which point the whole house of cards tumbles down.

I didn’t think it was possible for someone to both grieve and smirk at the same time, but apparently it is. In fact, the whole film »

- Wendy Ide

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On Body and Soul review – rule-breaking romance

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A Hungarian love story set in an abattoir uses startling juxtapositions to beguiling effect

Cinema might be guilty of creating many of the cliches of romance, but, occasionally at least, it also destroys them. And this year brings two particularly strong examples of the latter. On Body and Soul, the Berlin Golden Bear-winning account of two outcasts who find love in a Hungarian abattoir, might not have the showy impact of Guillermo Del Toro’s forthcoming The Shape of Water (mute cleaner hooks up with fish monster) but the pictures share two things. Both combine the fantastic and idiosyncratic to beguiling effect; both rewrite the rules that govern who is deemed worthy of love in the movies.

The two main characters in On Body and Soul are Endre (Géza Morcsányi), the reserved manager of a slaughterhouse who hides his emotions along with his useless left arm, and Maria (Alexandra Borbély »

- Wendy Ide

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San Sebastián: Film Factory Swoops on Witchcraft Thriller ’Akelarre’ (Exclusive)

7 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

San Sebastian — In one of the early deals to be announced out of the 65th San Sebastian Film Festival, which bowed Sept. 22 with the European premiere of Wim Wenders’ “Submergence,” starring Alicia Vikander and James McAvoy, Film Factory Entertainment has swooped on “Akelarre,” a flagship Basque project at this year’s Festival.

Currently in development, “Akelarre” will be presented Sunday at San Sebastian’s 2017 Europe-Latin America Co-Production Forum, where it weighs in as one of the Forum’s highest-profile projects.

A thriller, Akelarre is directed by Pablo Agüero, whose first short, “Primera Nieve,” won a 2006 Cannes Festival Jury Prize; “Salamndra,” his first feature, made the 2008 Cannes Directors’ Fortnight cut: “Eva Doesn’t Sleep” was selected for San Sebastián’s 2015 main competition.

Akelarre is produced by Sorkin Films, a new joint tax break investment vehicle launched last year by Koldo Zuazua’s San Sebastián-based Kowalski Films and Iker Ganuza co-headed Lamia Producciones, based out of Zarauz. »


- John Hopewell

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Pablo and Juan de Dios Larrain’s Fabula Sets Up U.S. Company (Exclusive)

7 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

San Sebastian – Fabula, one of Latin America’s high-profile producers, run by “Jackie” director Pablo Larraín and producer Juan de Dios Larraín, has set up a U.S. company to make English-language movies by its filmmakers from Latin America and Europe.

News of the move comes two months before Fabula, to date based just out of Santiago, Chile, goes into production on its first full-on U.S. project, a remake of Sebastián Lelio’s “Gloria,” starring Julianne Moore and directed by Lelio himself. Pre-production and production on “Gloria” will be carried out in the U.S., and post-production in Santiago, Pablo Larrain told Variety from Chile. Juan de Dios Larraín has relocated to Los Angeles to head up the new production company, called Fabula, whose offices open Monday.

The U.S production base is a milestone for one of Latin America’s most admired production companies, whose marquee directors Larraín and Lelio have already crossed into U »


- John Hopewell

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'The voice of the voiceless': how Viola Davis and Julius Tennon are changing the face of Hollywood

8 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The wife-and-husband team set up their own production company to tackle Hollywood’s persistent diversity problem

The actor Julius Tennon is thrilled to be appearing alongside his Oscar-winning wife, Viola Davis, in the new season of her hit show, How to Get Away with Murder, later this month. It is rare they work together onscreen.

Offscreen, however, the power couple spend much of their time working together for they have a joint mission: to change the face of Hollywood by increasing diversity across the industry.

Continue reading »

- Lucy Rock

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San Sebastian Film Review: ‘Memoir of Pain’

8 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Words don’t describe what eyes have seen,” we’re told in “Memoir of Pain,” esteemed French writer-director Emmanuel Finkiel’s notably ambitious interpretation of Marguerite Duras’s autobiographical novel “The War: A Memoir.” It’s perhaps an unexpected line to hear in a literary adaptation that remains in thrall to its imposing source text throughout, which is not to say that the camera doesn’t try some tricky visual articulation of its own. Several impressionistic, shadow-boxing passages of reverie punctuate the more straightforward storytelling in this account of a young French Resistance writer’s agonized wait for her husband to return from Nazi capture: Large as its historical canvas is, the film is most artful as an interior evocation of a preemptively grieving state of mind. If, at over two hours, it is an undeniably onerous watch, that is by design: Finkiel’s film certainly understands the taxing nature of sorrow.

Published »


- Guy Lodge

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‘The Vietnam War’ Filmmaker on the Horrifying Execution Footage That’s ‘Unbearable to Look At’

12 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following contains an image of graphic violence below, a photo taken during the war that is being discussed in context with the documentary and the Tet Offensive.]

At the halfway point of Ken Burns and Lynn Novick’s “The Vietnam War,” the documentary series reaches the Tết Offensive, one of the biggest military offensives by the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong that turned the tide of the war, even though it was deemed a failure. Episode 6, titled “Things Fall Apart” is one of the most relentless and graphically violent installments of the series so far, but is absolutely essential viewing to understanding how both the Vietnamese and Americans viewed the war going forward.

One of the biggest contributors to the American perception of the war occurred early on during the Tết Offensive, on its second day. After Northern Vietnamese spy Nguyễn Văn Lém violated the rules of warfare, Nguyễn was captured and then executed by South Vietnam’s General Loan. The image of the execution was captured by photographer Eddie Adams at the moment Loan’s bullet hit Nguyễn’s head. »


- Hanh Nguyen

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